Real Estate

Austria: Caution When Agreeing to Provisions Regarding Ancillary Costs and Expenses

If the Austrian Act on Tenancy Law (Mietrechtsgesetz “MRG“) is not fully applicable to a lease, and if neither party is a consumer according to the Consumer Protection Act (Konsumentenschutzgesetz “KSchG“), ancillary costs and expenses (in particular maintenance obligations), are only subject to the parties’ agreement. However, contractual provisions in general terms and conditions may still be invalid if they are not formulated precisely enough and grossly discriminate against a party to a lease agreement.

Provisions regarding ancillary costs and maintenance obligations

The regulations of the MRG regarding the maintenance obligations of the Lessor (Art 3 MRG) and the ancillary costs stipulated therein (Art 21 to 24 MRG) only apply to tenancies which are subject to the full application of the MRG.

Ancillary costs

With regard to tenancies which are not subject to the full application of the MRG, the obligation of the Lessee to bear ancillary costs is determined by an agreement concluded between the parties. According to Art 1099 of the Austrian Civil Code (“ABGB“) the Lessor is obliged to bear all charges and levies. This is, however, only suppletive law1, meaning that Art 1099 of the Austrian Civil Code can be displaced by an agreement between the parties of a lease agreement. A transfer of ancillary costs from the Lessor to the Lessee is therefore in principle permitted by derogation from Art 1099 ABGB which falls outside of the full application of the MRG.

However, if this agreement regarding the transfer of ancillary costs to the Lessee does not explicitly set out the costs which have to be borne by the Lessee, and if it is not clear from the agreement which costs have to be taken over by the Lessee, case-law stipulates a reference to the ancillary costs as set out in the MRG.2 To conclude a valid agreement regarding the ancillary costs, it is necessary to precisely define the costs which shall be borne by the Lessee, so that the Lessee’s future cost burden is assessable for the Lessee.

Maintenance obligations

In addition, a transfer of maintenance obligations to the Lessee outside of the full application of the MRG is permissible if none of the parties is a consumer according to the KSchG. This is also because section 1096 ABGB, which determines the maintenance obligations of the parties, is suppletive law. An agreement regarding maintenance obligations of the Lessee due to private autonomy also has to correspond with the principle of legal certainty. So, the scope of the Lessee’s maintenance obligations has to be explicitly set out in the lease agreement.

Control according to Art 879 para 3 ABGB

If the abovementioned provisions, which deviate from the suppletive legal situation, have been incorporated in general terms or contract forms, attention must be paid to Art 879 para 3 ABGB. Art 879 stipulates that a provision in general terms or in contract forms which determines subsidiary obligations, is invalid, if it grossly discriminates against one of the parties.

General Terms and contract forms

A lease agreement qualifies as a contract form if parts of such lease agreement (excluding the provisions regarding the payment of costs) were negotiated between the parties, and if the Lessor would not have intended a departure from these provisions (which the Lessor has used in all lease agreements3).

Supplementary obligations

Furthermore, Art 879 para 3 ABGB is only applicable to agreements regarding supplementary obligations, but not to agreements regarding the mutual major obligations of the parties. The Supreme Court has recognised that the transfer of uncertain maintenance obligations to the Lessee has to be qualified as a supplementary obligation, because the term “major obligation” shall be interpreted in a restrictive way4. The term “major obligation” is limited to such agreed provisions, which are necessary to avoid the invalidity of the lease agreement due to dissent. Agreements regarding the transfer of maintenance obligations in general terms and contract forms are therefore subject to a control according to Art 879 para 3 ABGB.

Grossly discriminating provision

An unlimited transfer of maintenance obligations to the Lessee would in any case be grossly discriminating, because the Lessee would expose itself to an invaluable future cost burden. On the other hand, the Lessor is entitled to invoice the rent and is exempt from any maintenance effort.5 A gross discrimination, according to Art 879 para 3 ABGB, occurs if the Lessee’s and the Lessor’s intended legal positions are considered to be in obvious disproportion, and if therefore no legitimate deviation from the suppletive provision (as a guiding principle for a fair balance of interests) is given6.

Therefore, to conclude a valid agreement regarding the transfer of additional maintenance obligations to the Lessee, the Lessor must grant the Lessee an appropriate consideration7. Otherwise the agreement would constitute an objectively unjustified deviation from the suppletive law8. An appropriate consideration chosen by many Lessors is crediting the maintenance obligations of the Lessee to the rent, and adding a price tag to such obligations so that it is still possible to check whether the rent is in total still within the legally permitted borders. It still remains to be seen whether the Supreme Court will accept this as a valid solution.

Even if the Austrian Act on Tenancy Law is not fully applicable to a lease and neither party is a consumer according to the Consumer Protection Act, there is still a risk that contractual provisions in general terms and conditions regarding ancillary costs and expenses may be invalid.

1
Suppletive law means that a respective legal provision can be displaced by an agreement between the parties. In the Austrian Legal System there are mandatory and suppletive provisions. The mandatory provisions cannot be displaced by an agreement, the suppletive provisions can be displaced by an agreement.
2
RS 0123383, 3 Ob 219/08i
3
2 Ob 20/14a, 7 Ob 93/12w
4
2 Ob /10i and 2 Ob /14a
5
7 Ob 93/12w
6
HS XXXVII/16
7
RS0016799, 7 Ob 93/12w
8
RS0126571, 7 Ob 93/12w

Österreich: Achtung bei der Vereinbarung von Betriebskosten und Erhaltungspflichten

Unterliegt ein Mietverhältnis nicht dem Vollanwendungsbereich des MRG und ist keine der Vertragsparteien Verbraucher im Sinne des KSchG, können die Bestimmungen bezüglich Betriebs- und Nebenkosten sowie über Erhaltungspflichten des Mieters von den Vertragsparteien frei vereinbart werden. Solche Bestimmungen können jedoch unwirksam sein, wenn sie in allgemeinen Geschäftsbedingungen und Vertragsformblättern enthalten sind, nicht präzise genug ausformuliert sind und eine Vertragspartei gröblich benachteiligen.

Bestimmungen bezüglich Betriebskosten und Erhaltungspflichten

Die Bestimmungen des MRG, welche die Erhaltungspflichten des Vermieters (§ 3 MRG) und die Betriebskosten (§§ 21 bis 24 MRG) betreffen, sind nur auf Mietverhältnisse anwendbar, welche dem Vollanwendungsbereich des MRG unterliegen.

Betriebskosten

Außerhalb des Vollanwendungsbereiches des MRG bestimmt sich die Verpflichtung des Mieters zur Tragung der Betriebskosten nach der mit dem Vermieter getroffenen Vereinbarung, weil die Bestimmung des § 1099 ABGB, wonach alle Lasten und Abgaben der Vermieter zu tragen hat, dispositives Recht darstellt und daher abweichende Vereinbarungen zulässig sind. Eine Überwälzung von Betriebskosten vom Vermieter auf den Mieter ist außerhalb des Vollanwendungsbereiches des MRG daher grundsätzlich möglich. Regelt diese Überwälzungsvereinbarung die vom Mieter zu tragenden Kosten jedoch nicht ausdrücklich und geht aus dieser Vereinbarung daher nicht klar hervor, welche Kosten genau vom Mieter zu übernehmen sind, sind regelmäßig die im MRG aufgezählten Betriebskosten gemeint1. Für die wirksame Vereinbarung einer Bestimmung, mit welcher Kosten auf den Mieter überwälzt werden sollen, ist es daher erforderlich, dass die vom Mieter zu übernehmenden Kosten in dieser Bestimmung präzise ausformuliert werden, sodass die zukünftige Kostenlast für den Mieter abschätzbar ist.

Erhaltungspflichten

Auch eine Überwälzung von Erhaltungspflichten auf den Mieter wird außerhalb des Vollanwendungsbereiches des MRG und außerhalb von Verbrauchergeschäften für zulässig erachtet, weil auch § 1096 ABGB, welcher die Erhaltungspflichten der Vertragsparteien regelt, dispositives Recht darstellt. Eine solche aufgrund der Privatautonomie der Vertragsparteien vereinbarte Instandhaltungsverpflichtung des Mieters muss jedoch ebenfalls dem Bestimmtheitsgebot entsprechen. Der Umfang der Instandhaltungspflichten des Mieters muss daher im Vertrag umschrieben sein.

Prüfung nach § 879 Abs 3 ABGB

Wurden solche von der dispositiven Rechtslage abweichende Bestimmungen in Allgemeinen Geschäftsbedingungen oder Vertragsformblättern aufgenommen, ist § 879 Abs 3 ABGB zu beachten. Gemäß § 879 Abs 3 ABGB ist eine in Allgemeinen Geschäftsbedingungen oder Vertragsformblättern enthaltene Vertragsbestimmung, die Nebenleistungspflichten festlegt, nichtig, wenn sie eine Vertragspartei gröblich benachteiligt.

Allgemeine Geschäftsbedingungen und Vertragsformblätter

Ein Vertragsformblatt im Sinne des Gesetzes liegt auch dann vor, wenn es sich nur auf Teile des Vertrags oder auf bestimmte Punkte bezieht und auch dann, wenn zwar Teile des Mietvertrages, nicht aber die Bestimmungen über die Kostentragung, zwischen den Vertragsparteien ausgehandelt wurden und die Vermieterin von diesen von ihr in allen Mietverträgen verwendeten Klauseln nicht abgegangen wäre2.

Nebenleistungspflichten

Die Bestimmung des § 879 Abs 3 ABGB ist ferner nur auf Vereinbarungen über Nebenleistungspflichten anwendbar, nicht jedoch auf Vereinbarungen über die gegenseiteigen Hauptleistungspflichten der Vertragsparteien. Gemäß höchstgerichtlicher Rechtsprechung ist die Überwälzung unbestimmter Erhaltungsarbeiten auf die Mieterin als Nebenleistung und nicht als Hauptleistung zu qualifizieren, weil der Begriff der Hauptleistung eng zu verstehen ist und davon nur jene Punkte erfasst sind, welche von der Willenseinigung umfasst sein müssten, damit der Vertrag nicht aufgrund Dissenses wegen Unbestimmtheit nichtig ist3. Vereinbarungen über eine Überwälzung unbestimmter Erhaltungsarbeiten in Allgemeinen Geschäftsbedingungen und Vertragsformblättern sind somit einer Kontrolle nach § 879 Abs 3 ABGB zu unterziehen.

Gröblich benachteiligende Bestimmung

Eine unbeschränkte Überwälzung der Erhaltungspflicht auf den Mieter wäre für diesen jedenfalls gröblich benachteiligend, weil er sich in diesem Fall einer unabschätzbaren künftigen Kostenlast aussetzen würde, während dem Bestandgeber der Bestandzins und die Befreiung von jeglichem Erhaltungsaufwand zu Gute käme4. Eine gröbliche Benachteiligung im Sinne des § 879 Abs 3 ABGB ist immer dann anzunehmen, wenn die dem Mieter zugedachte Rechtsposition in auffallendem Missverhältnis zur Rechtsposition des Vermieters steht und daher keine berechtigte Abweichung von der dispositiven Norm, als Leitbild eines ausgewogenen und gerechten Interessensausgleiches, vorliegt5.

Daher ist für eine wirksame Vereinbarung von zusätzlichen den Mieter treffenden Instandhaltungs – und Erhaltungspflichten die Gewährung einer angemessenen Gegenleistung erforderlich6, andernfalls würde diese Vereinbarung eine sachlich nicht gerechtfertigte Abweichung vom dispositiven Recht darstellen7. Eine entsprechende Gegenleistung wäre etwa die Anrechnung der vom Mieter übernommenen Instandhaltungs- und Erhaltungspflichten auf den Mietzins, sodass es möglich ist zu überprüfen, ob sich der Gesamtmietzins innerhalb des gesetzlich zulässigen Rahmens bewegt. Es wird sich noch herausstellen ob der OGH diese Lösung als zulässig anerkennen wird.

Auch wenn ein Mietverhältnis nicht dem Vollanwendungsbereich des MRG unterliegt und keiner der Vertragsparteien Verbraucher im Sinne des KSchG ist, besteht dennoch ein Risiko, dass vertraglich vereinbarte Bestimmungen bezüglich Betriebskosten und Erhaltungspflichten ungültig sein könnten.

1
RS 0123383, 3 Ob 219/08i
2
2 Ob 20/14a, 7 Ob 93/12w
3
2 Ob 73/10i und 2 Ob 20/14a
4
7 Ob 93/12w
5
HS XXXVII/16
6
RS0016799, 7 Ob 93/12w
7
RS0126571, 7 Ob 93/12w