Corporate / M&A

Serbia: Equitable Tender Offer Price in the Land of Illiquid Equities

Serbian capital markets are rich with illiquid equities (shares). The prices of these shares quoted at trading venues are inflated. This current state of Serbian capital markets, coupled with the tender offering pricing rules under the Serbian Takeover Act, warrants heightened scrutiny and clever acquisition planning for M&A deals in Serbia.

Serbia – An illiquid and shallow equity market

Serbian issuers predominately have been public issuers and their equities have been admitted to trading at a stock exchange or multilateral trading facility. This tendency has its roots in two Serbian capital market rules. The first rule – which was valid until 2011 – required all issuers to become public issuers and to list their shares on the Belgrade Stock Exchange. The second rule, which is still valid, requires all public issuers to have their equities traded at a stock exchange or multilateral trading facility (“MTF“).

Nonetheless, Serbian capital markets are not in great shape. Stock exchanges and MTF markets are quite illiquid and shallow. Equities of issuers are traded rarely and at low trading volumes. Against this background, the prices of these equities quoted at the stock exchange or MTF are far from representing their true market value.

Investors eyeing Serbian assets must take into account Serbian takeover rules when structuring a potential M&A deal. These rules can be burdensome and pricy, to the extent that they have the potential to spoil the entire economic rationale underlying a potential deal.

Pricy tender offer rules

The Serbian Takeover Act (2006) sets pricing rules that are applied in both mandatory and voluntary tender offers.

Under the statutory liquidity test, target shares are liquid if (i) their trading volume in the last six months was at least 0.5% of the total of the same class of shares issued by the target and (ii) the monthly trading volume for at least three months during that 6-month period was at least 0.05% of total of the same class shares issued by the target.

If target shares are liquid, the minimum price offered in the takeover bid must be the highest of the following:

(i) the volume weighted average share price (“VWAP“) at the stock exchange or MTF for the last 3 (three) months preceding the announcement of an intention to make a bid;

(ii) the closing trade price on the day before the takeover bid intention is published if the trading volume for the shares on that day was at least equal to an average daily trading volume for the target shares over the last three months;

(iii) the highest purchase price paid by the bidder or any party acting in concert with the bidder for target shares in the last 12 (twelve) months preceding a takeover bid trigger; or

(iv) the VWAP paid by the bidder or any party acting in concert with the bidder for the target shares in the last two years preceding a takeover bid trigger, provided they acquired more than 10% of the shares during that period.

If the target shares are illiquid, a minimum price offered in a tender offer must be the highest of the following:

(i) the highest share price calculated by applying the aforementioned formulas for liquid shares;

(ii) the book value of the shares calculated according to the most recently published annual financial statements of the target; or

(iii) the appraised value of the shares determined by a licensed auditor/appraiser.

(In)Equitable price in a mandatory tender offer

When structuring an M&A deal, these takeover pricing rules often generate pricing risks that cannot be controlled by either the seller or buyer.

It is not uncommon to have illiquid target shares listed at a stock exchange or MTF even in the absence of any trades involving them for months or years. Due to this apparent lack of liquidity, it is difficult to argue that these markets (stock exchange markets or the multilateral trading platform run by the Belgrade Stock Exchange) are efficient. As a result there are no reasonable grounds to assume that prices quoted at these venues incorporate all information about the equities traded there or that the prices reflect true value. What is more, such prices are often several times more than any equitable price that could be negotiated in a direct deal between a buyer and seller (for the controlling stake in the target). For these reasons, these prices should not be trusted or considered when trying to determine an equitable price of these illiquid equities.

Yet, the (often-inflated) market price of the target illiquid shares is a benchmark for setting a minimum price in a back-end mandatory tender offer. So even if at least one target share is traded at these inflated “market” prices, in the dawn of the mandatory tender offer, however, this usually inflated price will immediately represent the floor for any offer the buyer has to make to the target minorities in the follow-on mandatory tender offer. Practically, then the buyer will be forced to buyout the minorities at a price significantly above the price paid to the controlling shareholder. No matter how strong an “appetite” the buyer might have for the target, few investors’ “appetites” are strong enough to digest the risk of such a pricy deal.

Unfortunately, the pricing risk in a mandatory tender offer is further compounded by the fact that the book value of the target shares serves as a benchmark for setting a minimum price. Under the Serbian SEC’s rules, such book value of the target shares is determined by a reference to the last published annual financial statements of the target. Such financial statements are usually prepared as of 31 December of the previous calendar year, as most Serbian issuers report on a calendar year basis.

The application of this rule can lead to absurd situations. Let’s say the buyer closes a deal to buy a controlling stake in the target on 1 December. In a follow-on mandatory tender offer, the buyer will be forced to offer to minority shareholders (at least) the book value of a target share calculated by reference to the most recent 31 December (over 11 months old at that point date). This situation would be even more bizarre in circumstances where a buyer is forced to launch a mandatory tender offer in the first quarter of a year – when most Serbian targets have not yet released/published new financial statements. In such circumstances, the last published annual financial statement would be that of 31 December from the year before the last year. In other words, the book value of a target share in such cases will be calculated based on financial statements prepared more than 13 or 14 months before. In both hypotheticals, the book value of the target share would fail to reflect any financial events that happened or information that relates to the target’s business discovered in the interim.

Need for change

The application of these rules falls short of the ultimate goal of the takeover rules – to afford minority shareholders an option to sell out their shares to a new controlling shareholder of a target at an equitable price. The hypotheticals presented above show that the Serbian tender offer pricing rules come with the flaws embedded in them that in practice act as deterrents to M&A activity, as these rules afford the minority shareholder a right to request not simply an equitable price, but an unreasonable price.

Serbian lawmakers and the Serbian SEC should act swiftly to address these anomalies and propose betterments to these pricing formulas by dropping the market prices as benchmarks for illiquid shares and re-calibrating the book value rule to capture a share value as it is immediately before a launch of a tender offer.

Investors eyeing Serbian assets must take into account Serbian takeover rules when structuring a potential M&A deal. These rules can be burdensome and pricy, to the extent that they have the potential to spoil the entire economic rationale underlying a potential deal.

Srbija: Pravična cena akcija u ponudi za preuzimanje na tržištu nelikvidnih akcija

Srpska tržišta kapitala su puna nelikvidnih akcija. Cene ovih akcija na organizovanim tržištima su preuveličane. Ovo trenutno stanje srpskih tržišta kapitala, u tandemu sa pravilima o cenama u ponudi za preuzimanje u skladu sa Zakonom o preuzimanju akcionarskih društava, zahteva posebnu pažnju i pametno planiranje M&A transakcijama u Srbiji.

Srbija – nelikvidno i “plitko” tržište akcija

Izdavaoci u Srbiji su većinom javna društva a njihove akcije su uključene u trgovanje na regulisano tržište ili multilateralnu trgovačku platformu (“MTP“). Ovaj trend ima svoje korene u dva pravila tržišta kapitala u Srbiji. Prvo pravilo – koje je bilo na snazi do 2011. godine – zahtevalo je da svi izdavaoci “otvaraju”, postaju javna društva i uključuju svoje akcije na neko od tržišta Beogradske berze. Prema drugom pravilu, koje je još uvek na snazi, javna društva su u obavezi da uključe svoje akcije na regulisano tržište ili MTP.

Istovremeno, tržišta kapitala u Srbiji nisu u najboljem stanju. Regulisana tržišta i MTP su nelikvidna i “plitka”. Akcijama izdavalaca retko se trguje, a obim trgovanja je beznačajan. U tom kontekstu, cene tih akcija koje su navedene na ovim tržištima teško da će odražavati njihovu stvarnu tržišnu vrednost.

Investitori koji prate ciljna društva u Srbiji bi trebalo da uzmu u obzir srpska pravila o preuzimanju akcionarskih društava prilikom strukturiranja potencijalne M&A transakcije. Ta pravila mogu biti prilično zahtevna i skupa, do te mere da mogu pokvariti ekonomske modele na kojima se zasniva potencijalna transakcija.

Skupa pravila o ponudi za preuzimanje

Zakonom o preuzimanju akcionarskih društava Republike Srbije iz 2006. godine predviđena su pravila o utvrđivanju cena koja se primenjuju kako na obavezne, tako i na dobrovoljne ponude za preuzimanje.

Prema zakonskom testu likvidnosti, akcije ciljnog društva smatraju se likvidnim kada (i) je obim trgovanja tim akcijama u periodu od šest meseci koji prethodi danu nastanka obaveze objavljivanja obaveštenja o nameri preuzimanja predstavljao najmanje 0,5% ukupnog broja izdatih akcija iste klase i (ii) kada je najmanje u tri meseca tog perioda obim trgovanja iznosio najmanje 0,05% ukupnog broja izdatih akcija ciljnog društva iste klase.

Kada su akcije ciljnog društva likvidne, ponuđač je obavezan da u ponudi za preuzimanje ponudi najmanje najvišu cenu od sledećih cena:

• prosečna ponderisana cena akcija na regulisanom tržištu, odnosno MTP u poslednja 3 (tri) meseca pre objavljivanja obaveštenja o nameri preuzimanja;

• poslednja tržišna cena akcija na regulisanom tržištu, odnosno MTP po kojoj se trgovalo prethodnog radnog dana pre objavljivanja obaveštenja o nameri preuzimanja, ako je obim trgovanja najmanje jednak prosečnom dnevnom obimu trgovanja u poslednja tri meseca;

• najviša cena po kojoj je ponuđač ili lica koja s njim zajednički deluju stekao akcije ciljnog društva u poslednjih 12 meseci pre nastanka obaveze objavljivanja obaveštenja o nameri;

• prosečna ponderisana cena po kojoj je ponuđač ili lica koja s njim zajednički deluju u poslednje dve godine pre nastanka obaveze objavljivanja obaveštenja o nameri stekao najmanje 10% akcija ciljnog društva.

Kada akcije ciljnog društva nisu likvidne, ponuđač je obavezan da ponudi akcionarima najmanje najvišu cena od sledećih cena:

• najviša cena obračunata po prethodno opisanoj formuli koja se primenjuje na likvidne akcije;

• knjigovodstvena vrednost akcija obračunata u skladu sa poslednjim objavljenim finansijskim izveštajima ciljnog društva;

• procenjena vrednost akcija koju odredi ovlašćeni revizor/procenitelj.

(Ne)Pravična cena ponuđena u obaveznoj ponudi za preuzimanje

Ova pravila o utvrđivanju cena u ponudi za preuzimanje prilikom strukturiranja M&A transakcija često dovode do cenovnih rizika koje teško može da kontroliše bilo prodavac, bilo kupac.

Nije neuobičajeno da na regulisano tržište ili MTP budu uključene akcije ciljnog društva koje nisu likvidne, i kojima se mesecima ili godinama nije ni jednom trgovalo. Zbog tog očiglednog odsustva likvidnosti, teško bi se moglo reći da su ta tržišta (regulisana tržišta ili MTP kojima upravlja Beogradska berza) efikasna. Ne može se osnovano pretpostaviti da su cene na tim tržištima zasnovane na svim podacima o akcijama kojima se na njima trguje, niti da te cene održavaju pravu vrednost tih akcija. Štaviše, te cene su često nekoliko puta više od bilo koje pravične cene koja bi mogla biti utvrđena u direktnim pregovorima u transakciji između kupca i prodavca (prilikom kupovine kontrolnog učešća u ciljnom društvu). Sve ovo ukazuje na činjenicu da se u te cene nije moguće pouzdati, niti je moguće uzeti ih u obzir prilikom utvrđivanja pravične cene nelikvidnih akcija.

A ipak, te (često preuveličane) tržišne cene nelikvidnih akcija ciljnih društava predstavljaju reper za utvrđivanje minimalne cene u objavljenoj ponudi za preuzimanje. Stoga ako se bar jednom akcijom ciljnog društva trguje po takvoj preuveličanoj “tržišnoj” ceni neposredno pred objavljivanje obavezne ponude za preuzimanje, ta preuveličana cena automatski postaje minimalna cena koju je prodavac obavezan da ponudi manjinskim akcionarima ciljnog društva u ponudi za preuzimanje koja usledi. Kupac će praktično biti prinuđen da isplati manjinske akcionare po ceni koja je nekoliko puta viša od cene isplaćene kontrolnom akcionaru. Bez obzira na to koliko je jaka kupčeva želja da kupi ciljno društvo, mali broj investitora je spreman da snosi rizik tako skupog posla.

Cenovni rizik u obaveznoj ponudi za preuzimanje na žalost postaje još složeniji zbog drugog gore navedenog pravila. Druga kategorija cena koja predstavlja reper prilikom utvrđivanja minimalne cene nelikvidnih akcija ciljnog društva je knjigovodstvena vrednost akcija ciljnog društva. Prema pravilima Komisije za hartije od vrednosti Republike Srbije, knjigovodstvena vrednost akcija ciljnog društva određuje se u odnosu na poslednje objavljene finansijske izveštaje ciljnog društva. Finansijski izveštaji se obično pripremaju uzimajući u obzir stanje na dan 31. decembra prethodne kalendarske godine, jer većina izdavalaca u Srbiji podnosi finansijske izveštaje na osnovu kalendarske godine.

Primena ovog pravila može dovesti do apsurdnih situacija. Recimo da kupac zatvori transakciju kupovine kontrolnog učešća u ciljnom društvu 1. decembra. Kupac će u ponudi za preuzimanje koja usledi biti prinuđen da manjinskim akcionarima ponudi (najmanje) knjigovodstvenu vrednost po akciji ciljnog društva, obračunatu na dan prethodnog 31. decembra (stariju od 11 meseci). Ova hipotetička situacija bi bila još bizarnija ako bi kupac bio prinuđen da objavi obaveznu ponudu za preuzimanje u prvom tromesečju godine – periodu kada većina ciljnih društava u Srbiji još uvek nije izdala/objavila nove finansijske izveštaje. Poslednji objavljeni finansijski izveštaji ciljnog društva u tom trenutku bili bi oni od 31. decembra pretprošle godine. Tada bi se knjigovodstvena vrednost akcija ciljnog društva obračunavala na osnovu finansijskih izveštaja pripremljenih pre više od 13 ili 14 meseci. U obe hipotetičke situacije, knjigovodstvena vrednost akcija ciljnog društva svakako ne bi uzimala u obzir nikakav finansijski događaj koji se odigrao, kao ni podatak u vezi sa poslovanjem ciljnog društva koji je otkriven u međuvremenu.

Neophodne promene

Primenom ovih pravila dovodi se u pitanje krajnji cilj propisivanja pravila o preuzimanju akcionarskih društava – da se manjinskim akcionarima pruži mogućnost da prodaju svoje akcije novom kontrolnom akcionaru ciljnog društva po pravičnoj ceni. Prethodno navedeni hipotetički slučajevi pokazuju da pravila o objavljivanju ponuda za preuzimanje na snazi u Srbiji imaju inherentne nedostatke koji u praksi obeshrabruju zaključenje M&A transakcija, jer ta pravila omogućavaju manjinskim akcionarima da zahtevaju cenu koja nije pravična, već je nerazumna.

Zakonodavac i Komisija za hartije od vrednosti Republike Srbije trebalo bi brzo da reaguju kako bi otklonili ove anomalije i predložili poboljšanu verziju ovih formula – isključenjem tržišnih cena kao repera za nelikvidne akcije i izmenom pravila o knjigovodstvenoj vrednosti tako da ono uzme u obzir vrednost akcija koja postoji neposredno pre objavljivanja ponude za preuzimanje.

Investitori koji prate ciljna društva u Srbiji bi trebalo da uzmu u obzir srpska pravila o preuzimanju akcionarskih društava prilikom strukturiranja potencijalne M&A transakcije. Ta pravila mogu biti prilično zahtevna i skupa, do te mere da mogu pokvariti ekonomske modele na kojima se zasniva potencijalna transakcija.